REAL MADRID

Courtois' form nosedives at Madrid

Courtois registra los peores números de su carrera como futbolista.

David Ramos

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The Belgian keeper is currently conceding 1.32 goals per game and one every 68 minutes, a far cry from his time at both Atlético and Chelsea.

Form

As Madrid hit crisis mode, the form of some players under Solari has inevitably come under the microscope for dissection. One such player is Thibaut Courtois. The Belgian keeper started in the 1-0 defeat to Barcelona in LaLiga and in Madrid's forgettable night in their 4-1 thrashing by Ajax. Yet the five goals shipped in two games come as no surprise with this year's Madrid side. Courtois has never kept such a porous goal throughout a season, in this case his first for the club. In this 2018-19 campaign, Courtois has played 31 games and conceded 41 goals, keeping a clean sheet on ten occasions. Therefore, he is conceding 1.32 goals a game, one every 68 minutes. In other words, he is unbeaten in only 32% of games played. 

Atlético and Chelsea

Strikingly, this return is a far cry from his time at both Atlético Madrid and Chelsea, and even Genk, where he made his professional debut. Courtois' meanest goalkeeping stint came at Atlético under Simeone, where he played 154 games and conceded 125 goals, keeping a clean sheet on 76 occasions and conceding an average of 0.81 goals per game (in 48% of matches played). At Chelsea, out of 154 games played, he let in 152 goals, keeping his goal unbreached on 58 occasions, which means he was unbeaten in 37% of the games he started. 

Competition in the Madrid goal

Of course, Keylor Navas has been the one to suffer the most - apart from the Madrid fans - with Courtois' arrival, but the Costa Rican keeper - possibly one of the most underrated in recent years - has generally stepped up when called upon. This year he has played 14 games, conceding 15 and keeping four clean sheets (1.07 goals per game and a goal conceded every 86 minutes). 

It also goes without saying that these statistics are relative and depend on the defence and even the trainer - since Solari took over he has tried out 13 different defensive formations and back-fours.