GEORGE FLOYD DEATH

George Floyd autopsy: no sign of traumatic asphyxia or strangling

The autoposy from Hennepin says there was no signs of strangulation despite the video evidence that spread around the world and caused protests in Minnesota.

George Floyd autopsy: no sign of traumatic asphyxia or strangling

Update, Tuesday 2 June: Two autopsies say Floyd died by homicide, but differ on cause

The death of George Floyd in Minneosta has caused protests across the United States. The official autopsy, which was published by CNN, has added to the drama that has unfolded since the video of Derek Chauvin kneeling on Floyd until he became unresponsive spread around the world.

"No physical findings that support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation," says the official autopsy. "Mr. Floyd had underlying health conditions including coronary heart disease. The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death."

The Floyd family have reportedly ordered their own independent autopsy from Dr. Michael Baden. Attorney Benjamin Crump, who is representing Floyd's family, said that any talk of a heart condition or asthma was irrelevant because Floyd was walking and breathing before his contact with police.

There has also been criticism over the wording of the autopsy. The insinuation that he had ingested something is based on nothing explicitly specified in the report. It seems those writing the report have included "potential intoxicants" as an aggravating factor in Floyd's death without any proof.

Chauvin fired and arrested, Minnesota Mayor speaks

Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer shown in video footage pinning Floyd down on the street with his knee, was charged with murder in the case on Friday.

Chauvin, who was dismissed from the police with three fellow officers the day after Monday's fatal encounter, was arrested on third-degree murder and manslaughter charges for his role in the death of Floyd, 46. His wife has also filed for divorce after the incident.

“Being black in America should not be a death sentence,” Jacob Frey, the Mayor of Minnesota, said at a news conference on Tuesday. “I believe what I saw and what I saw is wrong on every level.”

Frey was elected on the promise to fix the broken relationship between the community and police but recent events show he has a very long way to go.