Coronavirus

Stimulus check: why is there no agreement on a second $1,200 payment?

Republicans and Democrats are focused on sending out a second round of stimulus checks worth $1,200 per individual with similar terms to the CARES Act.

Stimulus check: why is there no agreement on a second $1,200 payment?
JIM WATSON AFP

Democrats and Republicans missed the 7 August deadline to draft and approve the latest stimulus relief package amid the coronavirus pandemic in the USA, leading President Donald Trump to sign a series of executive orders to try and prop up the ailing economy. However, Trump's measures did not include a second round of stimulus checks and with the deadline pushed back so both parties can reach an agreement millions of Americans have been left wondering if a second stimulus check will be forthcoming at all.

President Trump frustrated

Trump said on Friday that he was disappointed with Congress and he was going to use the power of the executive order to sign a stimulus relief package. Top Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer said that the White House rejected an offer by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to curb the Democrat's spending proposals by about $1 trillion.

The White House needs to negotiate with Democrats and meet us in the middle. Don’t say it is your way or no way,” said Schumer.

Both Parties in disagreement

Congress has yet to approve a stimulus relief package and the Senate is is now in recess. There are plenty of measures that Republicans and Democrats can’t agree on, but it appears that both parties concur on the need for a second round of $1,200 stimulus payments. Also clouding the issue is another proposal on the table that was drafted by Mitt Romney, Marco Rubio and other Republican senators.

This proposal includes a second round of stimulus checks worth $1,000 per individual and another $1,000 for each dependent. Under this draft families that are struggling amid the pandemic could receive more money but it appears that both parties are focusing on the $1,200 amount, which will be issued under similar terms as the CARES Act when both sides can agree on a range of other issues.