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SUPER BOWL LVI

Super Bowl LVI 2022: how much do tickets cost as a resell?

Super Bowl LVI was meant to be the people’s Super Bowl, wasn’t it? The shocking amount of money being charged for a seat is keeping the real fans out

Update:
Super Bowl LVI was meant to be the people’s Super Bowl, wasn’t it? The shocking amount of money being charged for a seat is keeping the real fans out

Super Bowl LVI has been making the headlines bubble and boil this year, as much for everything around the event as for the game itself. From the halftime show, which sees 90s gangsta rap become gentrified, if not downright venerable, to the stadium itself, an architectural triumph that weaves working-class Angelinos into the fabric of its setting in a way that only Dodger Stadium can rival.

On the field, the NFL title game will have lots of headline-grabbing stories: the number-one-pick quarterback who got here faster than any other versus the number-one-pick quarterback who got here slower than (almost) any other, the two young coaches who have flipped the NFL on its head, the two fourth-seed teams facing off for the crown, newspaper and online journos have no shortage of material to fawn over.

But one story has grabbed the public’s attention like no other. Ticket prices. Super Bowl LVI was meant to be the people’s Super Bowl, wasn’t it? The Rams have come home after a generation. The new stadium was built, not in Glendale or Pasadena, but in Inglewood, accessible to all. But then reports came out that parking would cost well over $100, some reports said $300. And no, the NFL would not lift their “no tailgating” rule for this Super Bowl.

And then the ticket prices were front and center. The shocking amount of money being charged for a seat at the big game had jaws dropping and tongues wagging all over the world. A ticket to Super Bowl I would have set you back $10, which is the equivalent of $79 today. The cheapest ticket to Super Bowl LVI is $5900, a 7468% rise in real value.

The fans have been raging and even the players have gotten involved. Chad Ochocinco tweeted his dismay. Surely the players, most of whom came from very humble beginnings, would prefer to play the biggest game of their life in front of true fans rather than the pampered select. Or perhaps they are simply circumspect with the source of their multi-million dollar contracts.

Although ticket scalping has a very bad image, it isn’t actually illegal. And with the resale sites like StubHub and SeatGeek making big gains by providing a platform for ticket holders to capitalize on their holding, the NFL has gotten involved in a big way. Verified resale tickets on the NFL’s official ticket marketplace, Ticketmaster, are reportedly going for as much as $55,000 each. News outlets have noted a downturn in demand has led to a $1000 drop in the last 24 hours, perhaps due to the fans’ disgust driving down demand, and Ticketmaster currently has nosebleed tickets listing at $3100 plus fees of over $1300.

Going to a football game, even the season final championship game, should not be a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Football is about season tickets, it is about lifelong fandom, and a personal tie to the team that transcends business and money. The NFL has perhaps lost sight of that and as long as they wink at the discourse of ticket scalping, things will only get worse. So much for the fans.

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