MEXICO CITY EARTHQUAKE

Mexico earthquake: World para-swimming and para-powerlifting championships postponed

Mexico earthquake: World para-swimming and para-powerlifting championships postponed

CARLOS JASSO

REUTERS

Both championships postponed by the International Paralympic Committee were scheduled to take place in Mexico City later this month
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The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) on Wednesday postponed its world championships in swimming and powerlifting following the devastating earthquake in Mexico City.

Both championships, with more than more than 1,400 athletes and officials involved, were scheduled to run from 30 September to 6 October in Mexico City.

This is the first time the IPC has been forced to postpone a major event.

"The immediate focus of the Mexican authorities should be on prioritising recovery and rebuilding for the Mexican people and not organising two major international sport events," said IPC’s president Andrew Parsons.

"The tragic loss of life and devastation caused is heart breaking to see and our deepest sympathies are with all those involved."

Rescheduling pending

According to Parsons, the IPC will now work on ensuring the safe departure of team delegations that were already in Mexico City.

An assessment on the rescheduling of the championships remains pending.

The two chosen venues for the events, the Francisco Márquez Olympic Swimming Pool and the nearby Juan de la Barrera Olympic Gymnasium, have no major damages.

However, hotels set to accommodate athletes, officials and staff, have been damaged and still require evaluation.

Australian Paralympic swimmer Monique Murphy, who was set to compete in Mexico City, said her concerns are “with the people in Mexico.”

"I’m definitely just hoping that everyone in Mexico is safe because it sounds pretty horrible over there right now," Murphy told the Australian newspaper Gold Coast Bulletin.

7.1 magnitude quake

Tuesday’s 7.1 magnitude earthquake has left 225 dead so far. There are major damages in Mexico City and in the neighboring states.

Rescuers are scrambling to reach survivors trapped inside fallen buildings.

Ongoing efforts continue at the Enrique Rebsamen School, in the southern part of Mexico City, where children are still pinned inside the debris.

Soccer stadiums, including Mexico’s biggest arena, the Estadio Azteca, are being used as relief centres for victims.

At least 38 buildings have been reduced to ruins, while the condition of others remains uncertain.

The world of sport has shown its support to the Mexican people after the disaster.

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