England stops the egotistical European Super League

The owners of the ‘Big Six’ aren’t English, they’re from elsewhere. People who move around in private jets, from VIP suite to exclusive properties. They have no contact with the outside world, they wouldn’t even catch a humble taxi. And they were taken aback and shocked by the reaction from the county whose most emblematic teams they thought they’d taken control of. The visceral reaction came from all parts: from Prince William; from football’s foot soliders, the fans who blocked Chelsea’s arrival at the ground; and even from Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who called them a cartel. It left the owners shaken. They had never imagined this and decided to dishonoroubly exit stage left.

**Follow all the latest news on, and reaction to, the European Super League**

Football was born in England

England stopped the Super League with the reaction from the people and with the feelings of the game’s players and coaches. Football was born there, it impregnates the spirit of society. The complaints came just as strongly, or even more so, from the favoured clubs as the rest. This project, born out of an ultra-liberal fever that does not understand rules or values, provoked a reaction from a country that understands football as a sporting agreement among gentlemen, not a business based on exponential growth. And not even the owners of the Big Six have been able to face it down. There is a romantic edge to this victory of the people over the multibillionaires who want to subvert football.

Clubs leaving the Super League

Germany and France were already missing (can you have Europe without them?) and yesterday, Wednesday, the withdrawals continued, in Italy and Spain. By midday Real Madrid and Barcelona were left, who could play a decent Trofeo Colombino bringing in Betis and Recre. Now they can start the refrain of: “UEFA steals from us, we’ll do it again”, but it would be better to accept Rummenigge’s suggestion and lower costs, something that Madrid have very visibly failed to do, with their new stadium, and nor have Barcelona, with the preposterous way they’ve run the club. An idea that looked superb on a pen drive has been rejected by the people for being selfish and sacrilegious. Football is football.