REAL MADRID

Ancelotti's salary and the clause which protects Real Madrid

Everton, AS understands, didn't put any obstacles in Carlo Ancelotti's way as the Italian returns to Spain for his second spell as Real Madrid coach.

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Carlo Ancelotti is on his way back to Spain to take the Real Madrid coaching post. The first two seasons of his first stint at the club were hugely successful - under his guidance the team won the Champions League, Copa del Rey, European Super Cup and the Club World Cup. His first spell in the job was underpinned by the successes of a formidable frontline the 'BBC', but in this, his second spell, he finds himself having to face an overhaul of the squad, with several key players now over 30 years of age (Kroos, Modric, Ramos, Benzema…) and younger players who have yet to establish themselves. So he will need time to work on the team. It is a long-term project and for now, he has agreed to a three-year deal.

Everton did not put any obstacles in his way - even though he had a lengthy contract with the Merseysiders.That was a relief to Madrid as they did not have to pay a large sum to Everton as compensation. Under Ancelotti, the team finished tenth in the Premier League.

Ancelotti's contract with Real Madrid will be for three seasons. It is a strategy that the club has utilised in recent years to save money and cover their own backs. A clause in the contract would allow the club to dismiss the coach but pay him what he is owed in wages for the remainder of that season plus another year.

For instance, if a coach earns 12 million euros (one million per month) and is sacked at the end of April, they will be owed two million euros (corresponding to May and June of that season), plus an additional season's wages  (12 million) - even if the coach has another two or three years left on their contract.

In Ancelotti's case, details of what salary he has agreed with Real Madrid for this second spell at the club have not yet emerged, but we can get a good idea of what kind of offer Madrid made to lure him back. In England, the Italian was earning 11 million pounds per season at Everton. Coaches in general are earning more than a few years back. Mourinho, for example, usually says that he will accept a salary which is one euro more than the team's star player so that the players will respect him. But that arrangement at clubs with superstars like Messi, Griezmann, Bale, Cristiano, Hazard and Benzema is practically impossible.