Olympic Games

How many medals did China, Great Britain, Russia and Japan get at the Rio Olympics 2016?

With the Tokyo Olympics, postponed by the coronavirus pandemic, due to start on 23 July, we take a look back at how the nations performed at Rio 2016.

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How many medals did China, Great Britain, Russia and Japan get at the Rio Olympics 2016?
Dylan Martinez REUTERS

The Tokyo Olympics are almost upon us after the postponement of the 2020 Games by a year due to the global coronavirus pandemic and the USA will be the heavy favourites to top the medal table in Japan after sweeping to victory at Rio 2016 five years ago, when 206 nations competed at the Games. The USA's medal haul, led by Michael Phelps, Simone Biles and Katie Ledecky, was the country's biggest at a Games not staged in the USA and their third-largest tally in Olympics history.

The Great Britain and Northern Ireland team staged something of a surprise by finishing second with their best-ever medal tally of 67, two more than Team GB achieved at their home Olympics in 2012.

In third place were China, with Russia, Germany, Japan, France, South Korea, Italy and Australia completing the top 10. The host nation finished 13th with 19 medals while the Refugee Olympic Team, who will compete again in Tokyo, won many hearts but no medals competing under the IOC banner.

Rio 2016: top medal winners

A total of 87 nations were represented on the medal table at Rio 2016, with 67 countries earning at least one gold. There was one clean sweep on the podium, with USA athletes Brianna Rollins, Nia Ali and Kristi Castlin takig all three medals in the 110m hurdles. Phelps won six medals in total, five of them gold, to take his all-time Olympic haul to 22, while Biles and Ledecky both scored five medals, including four golds each. Hungarian swimmer Katinka Hosszu picjed up three golds and a silver while Ryan Murphy also won three golds in the pool. 

Usain Bolt, competing in his final Olymipics, completed a hat-trick of sprint sweeps with gold in the 100m and 200m. 

Rio 2016 medal table

1: United States (121, 46 gold)

2: Great Britain and Northern Ireland (67, 27 gold)

3: China (70, 26 gold)

4: Russia (56, 19 gold)

5: Germany (42, 17 gold)

6: Japan (41, 12 gold)

7: France (42, 10 gold)

8: South Korea (21, 9 gold)

9: Italy (28, 8 gold)

10: Australia (29, 8 gold)