Olympic Games

Social Media Theories about Anti-Sex Beds at the Tokyo Olympics are “fake news”

Irish gymnast Rhys McClenaghan posted a video on Twitter jumping on the so-called anti-sex beds and proving their durability.

AStv / Jennifer Bubel

Organizers of the Tokyo Olympics provided recyclable cardboard beds, which led to theories about discouraging sex and close contact amongst participants.

Covid-19 measures in place at Olympic Games

Several new measures were put into place for the Summer games in order to stop the spread of covid-19. Alcohol sales have been banned, less free condoms will be provided than ever before, only about a third of what was provided at the Rio Games in 2016. So the unusual cardboard beds were quickly labeled “anti-sex beds” after American distance runner, Paul Chelimo, posted the theory on Twitter.

Debunking the theory

When Rhys McClenaghan posted this video jumping on one of the beds and proving how sturdy they actually are, the official Olympics Twitter account reposted it, saying “Thanks for debunking the myth”.

In reality, the beds are the first to ever be made almost completely of recyclable materials and were announced before the start of the pandemic. They are actually more durable than wood or steel, according to the Japanese company, Airweave, which created them. Rather than discouraging sex, they are meant to be customizable to athletes of all body types.