Coronavirus USA summary: cases, deaths, and news - 25 June

Coronavirus live USA: latest Covid-19 news - 25 June

US

US coronavirus latest: 14:00 PT/17:00 ET on Thursday 25 June (23:00 CEST)

According to the latest figures published by Johns Hopkins University9,504,233 cases have been detected worldwide, with 484,356 deaths and 4,786,039 people have recovered.

In the USA, there have been 2,407,167 confirmed cases and 122,320 deaths with 656,161 people recovering from the virus.

Prepaid debit cards were used as a method to pay those who didn't have their bank details on the IRS files, but things have been far from plain sailing.

Kentucky Derby change

The most famous horse racing event in the world, usually held in May, will now take place from 1-5 Sept. The Kentucky Derby will be on 5 Sep, and the Kentucky Oaks — a race for 3-year-old fillies — will run a day earlier.

Hospitalization rates up in 16 states

Twelve states hit record highs in daily new cases on Wednesday based on their seven-day average, the analysis found. They include Arizona, Arkansas, California and Florida. Arizona also hit a record high in average daily new deaths with a seven-day average of nearly 31 new lives lost.

Stimulus check issued to a million deceased

A US government watchdog pointed to the Trump administration's poor response to the coronavirus pandemic, including nearly $1.4 billion sent to deceased Americans.

20 million suspected infected

US health officials believe 20 million Americans have had coronavirus.

Healthcare lie admission

Whistleblower and reformed insurance propagandist Wendell Potter shares a thread...

CDC head warns pregnant women with Covid-19 face greater risks

Pregnant women have increased risk of severe COVID-19 compared to women who are not pregnant, the head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Prevention Robert Redfield told reporters on Thursday, warning that states with rising coronavirus cases need to take action.

The CDC has found that pregnant women are more likely to be admitted to the ICU and to be put on mechanical ventilators than non-pregnant women, he said. Redfield said that more infections among young people in Florida and Texas could partly be attributed to an increase in diagnosing illness among that group, whose members are less likely to be hospitalized than older people.

He said the agency plans to use social media platform Tik Tok to try to reach young people with warnings to keep a distance of 6 feet, wear a face covering and avoid large gatherings. 

There is no debate...

Masking defiance in America

There have been some raised eyebrows around the world after this interaction between experts and...non-experts.

POTUS in Wisconsin

Later today will Trump speak about the pandemic or keep talk away from that?

Cuomo says New York 'bent the curve' as cases keep rising in other states

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo celebrated a new milestone of declining coronavirus hospitalizations in his state on Thursday as the number of new cases elsewhere in the United States kept climbing, especially in the West and South.

More than 36,000 new cases of Covid-19 were recorded nationwide on Wednesday, a few hundred shy of the record 36,426 on 24 April, concentrated on states that were spared the brunt of the initial outbreak or moved early to lift restrictions aimed at curbing the virus' spread.

The focus of the pandemic has moved to the U.S. West and South, including more sparsely populated rural areas, from the early epicenter around New York state, where more than 31,000 deaths were recorded, more than a quarter of the country's total.

Cuomo said on Thursday that his state reached a new milestone as the number of people hospitalized with Covid-19 fell to 996, the first time since March 18 that the number was below 1,000. 'Together we bent the curve,' he said on Twitter. 'And we aren’t stopping now.'

Virus

Coronavirus pandemic getting worse globally - WHO

The Covid-19 pandemic is subsiding in Europe, but getting worse globally with the number of infections expected to reach 10 million next week and the number of deaths 500,000, the head of the World Health Organisation Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said.

Speaking via video-conference with members of the European Parliament's health committee, Tedros said that once the pandemic was over, the world should not return to its previous state, but build a 'new normal' that would be fairer, greener and help prevent climate change.

Stimulus payments: CARES Act vs HEROES Act vs travel tax credit

Many Americans are eager for further financial relief to follow the CARES Act stimulus check, with the HEROES Act check and a travel tax credit two major proposals put forward.

Full details:

Texan cities could see "apocalyptic" coronavirus numbers

Dr Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, has told CNN that major cities in the US state of Texas are at risk of recording "apocalyptic" coronavirus numbers.

"The big metro areas seem to be rising very quickly and some of the models are on the verge of being apocalyptic," Hotez said.

"That is really worrisome and as those numbers rise, we're seeing commensurate increases in the number of hospitalizations and ICU admissions. You get to the point where you overwhelm ICUs and that's when the mortality goes up."

Texas said on Wednesday that it had recorded more than 5,551 new coronavirus cases in the previous 24-hour cycle, the state’s highest surge in infections yet.

WHO warns of oxygen shortage amid Covid-19 fight

The secretary general of the World Health Organization (WHO), Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, has warned of a worldwide shortage of the oxygen equipment needed to treat coronavirus patients.

“WHO estimates that at the current rate of about one million new cases a week, the world needs about 620,000 cubic meters of oxygen a day, which is about 88,000 large cylinders,” Adhanom Ghebreyesus said.

“However, many countries are now experiencing difficulties in obtaining oxygen concentrators. 80% of the market is owned by just a few companies and demand is currently outstripping supply.”

NY

Phase 2 in full swing in New York

People eat and drink at tables placed outside of a Manhattan restaurant on Wednesday, day three of the second stage of New York's re-opening from restrictions imposed to curb the coronavirus pandemic.

Phase 2 permits the reopening of offices, in-store retail, outdoor dining, barbers and beauty parlors and numerous other businesses. New York state is planning a four-phased gradual reopening in an attempt to stop the spread of the virus.

(Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images/AFP)

"It’ll make sure everything is OK for a few more months"

As Americans wait to find out whether they'll be getting a second stimulus check, CNBC has spoken to readers in need of another payment about the financial toll the coronavirus pandemic has taken on their lives.

"We eat breakfast later in the day so that we don’t have to eat lunch," mother of four Virginia Hodge, who has been furloughed from her job, told the media outlet. "It [a second stimulus check] will make sure everything is OK for a few more months."

Hawaii to demand proof of negative Covid-19 test from tourists

Tourists to Hawaii will be required to show proof of a negative coronavirus test on arrival in the US state if they are to avoid being subject to a 14-day quarantine period, Governor David Ige has announced.

“Asking passengers to get a negative Covid-19 test prior to travel is one more tool in our layered screening process that will help keep Hawaii safe,” Ige said of the rule, which will come into effect on 1 August. 

“As we navigate this pandemic, any way we can minimize risk while bringing some normalcy to our daily lives is the right path forward.”

US airport screening

Airport screening system tested out

A traveler at Los Angeles International Airport is displayed on a monitor walking past a test system of thermal imaging cameras which check body temperatures.

The system is being tested in the international terminal for 12 weeks and can flag passengers who have a fever, one of the symptoms of the coronavirus.

(Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images/AFP)

Without masks, you cannot enter Caesars casinos

Caesars Entertainment Corp spoke on Wednesday and published new measures for all people who want to go to their casinos and other properties in the United States.

Coronavirus | July 4

Although some celebrations for July 4 will be smaller or canceled, in the United States what prevails is the sale of fireworks, something that has caused annoyance among some citizens.

Coronavirus USA | Disneyland Resort

Disneyland Resort in Southern California reported that they will not be able to open their doors on July 17, as previously announced. The reason is due to the security protocols that have been implemented in the state.

Coronavirus USA | Senate questions meat export to China

Senators in the United States have questioned companies for the export of beef, pork and chicken to China, due to in the United States a high rate of contagion has been detected in workers in this area in recent months.

BREAKING

Learn about the US states that have ordered quarantine for some travelers

Trump

Approval of Trump's coronavirus response sinks to lowest on record amid surge in cases

American approval of President Donald Trump's handling of the coronavirus pandemic has dropped to the lowest level on record, the latest Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll shows, as new COVID-19 cases surged and Trump was widely criticized for suggesting he wanted to slow down testing.

The June 22-23 poll also found that a majority of Americans want Trump's former national security adviser, John Bolton, to testify to Congress under oath, after he accused Trump in a new book of misdeeds, including seeking Chinese President Xi Jinping's help to win re-election.

The poll shows that 37% of Americans approved of the way Trump has responded to the pandemic, the lowest on record since Reuters/Ipsos started asking the question at the beginning of March. Fifty-eight percent said they disapproved.

University of Washington forecasts 180,000 U.S. deaths from COVID-19 by October

New U.S. COVID-19 forecasts project nearly 180,000 deaths in the United States through the beginning of October, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington said on Wednesday.

Americans protest against having to wear face masks

Despite rising cases and increased deaths as a result of the pandemic, certain US citizens are outraged at the prospect of being obliged to wear face-masks.

Coronavirus: the complete guide to the Covid-19 pandemic

Apple to shut seven retail stores in Houston again as COVID-19 cases jump

Apple Inc is set to shut seven of its retail locations in Houston, Texas again due to an increase in the number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States, the company said Wednesday.

Apple has said it is monitoring conditions in each community where it operates stores to determine when to open and close them. The Houston re-closures follow similar moves last week in Florida, Arizona, South Carolina, and North Carolina.

"We take this step with an abundance of caution as we closely monitor the situation and we look forward to having our teams and customers back as soon as possible," Apple said in a statement.

shares

Wall Street finishes lower on rising virus cases, weak economic view

Wall Street's three major indexes on Wednesday suffered their biggest daily percentage drop in almost two weeks as a surge in U.S. coronavirus cases intensified fears of another round of government lockdowns and worsening economic damage.

Nasdaq, which had registered its fifth record closing high on Tuesday, snapped an eight-day wining streak, which was its longest since December 2019.

The session marked the biggest percentage decline for all three indexes, including a 2.6% drop for the S&P 500, since June 11 when the S&P fell 5.89%.

The United States has recorded the second-largest rise in infections since the health crisis began, with a flare-up of cases in states where restrictions meant to contain the disease were lifted early.

The governors of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut announced that visitors from states with high coronavirus infection rates must self-quarantine for 14 days on arrival. "Today was finally the day markets came to terms with the fact that increasing COVID-19 cases could mean a slower recovery in the economy," said Art Hogan, chief market strategist at  National Securities in New York.

The pandemic appeared to be causing wider and deeper damage to economic activity than first thought. The IMF said it  now expects global output to shrink by 4.9%, compared with a 3.0% contraction predicted in April.

California hospitalizations surge with new COVID-19 cases

The number of people hospitalized in California with COVID-19 has increased by nearly a third over the past two weeks, with about 1,500 suspected or confirmed patients requiring intensive care, officials said on Wednesday.

The state also reported its largest ever spike in confirmed new cases on Tuesday, Governor Gavin Newsom told a news briefing. Further increases are expected when test results from people who participated in massive anti-racism protests start coming in, he said.

Coronavirus infections and hospitalizations have also risen sharply in other parts of the United States.

California's 7,149 new infections announced Wednesday brought the state total to 190,222, caused partly by a rise in testing, Newsom said. But much is the result of people failing to engage in safe practices when gathering with friends  and family, or visiting newly reopened businesses, he said.

2.3 million coronavirus cases now confirmed in the US

Coronavirus live US updates: welcome

Hello and welcome to our live, United States-focused coverage of the coronavirus pandemic, which had registered over nine million cases and over 480,000 deaths worldwide, according to figures compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

We'll endeavour to keep you abreast of the chief developments occurring in the US, where the Covid-19 pandemic has so far led to over 2.3 million cases and over 121,000 fatalities.

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