TOKYO GAMES

Throwing at Olympics: how much do the discus, hammer and javelin weigh?

The discus, hammer throw, javelin, and shot put are all Olympic throwing events at the Tokyo Olympics. They require immense strength, power, and balance.

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Raven Saunders
HANNAH MCKAY REUTERS

There are four throwing events at the Olympics: the discus, hammer throw, javelin and shot put. These athletics events require immense strength, as the athletes need to hurl these objects far distances. But just how much do these objects weigh?

How much does the discus weigh in the Olympics?

The discus weighs 2.2 pounds (1 kg) for women, and 4.4 pounds (2 kg) for men. This medal disc is thrown by the athletes inside a circle, which the athletes cannot step out of. However, the athletes can touch the edge of the circle, which has a diameter of 2.5 meters.

How much does the hammer weigh in the Olympics?

The 119.5 centimeter wire has a steel ball attached to it. The men’s hammer weighs 16 pounds (7.26 kg) in the Olympics and the women’s hammer weighs 8 pounds (4 kg). Before the athlete releases the hammer, they typically circle in a couple of revolutions. Athletes in this event say the secret to the event is patience and balance.

How much does the javelin weigh in the Olympics?

The men’s javelin weighs at least 1.76 pounds, whereas the women’s javelin weighs at least 1.3 pounds. The men’s javelin is about 8 feet, 6 inches. The women’s javelin is about 7 feet, 2.5 inches. The javelin is typically made of steel, aluminum or aluminum alloy.

How much does the discus weigh in the Olympics?

The medal ball weighs 16 pounds for men and 8 pounds for women. Unlike the hammer, the shot put involves pushing, rather than throwing.

Raven Saunders stole the show winning silver in the shot put finals, winning a silver medal for team USA.

Saunders is known as “the Hulk” by her fans. After winning the event, Saunders stood in protest for the BLACK, LGBTQIA+, Or those that are struggling mentally. She said she has been extremely zoned in this Olympics because she came to Tokyo with one goal in mind: to get a medal. She wants to dedicate her silver medal to young girls and boys around the world. Saunders said the medal was bigger than her, “it’s not just about me.”