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Tiger Woods the third athlete to become a billionaire

The 46-year-old’s net worth is at least $1 billion, based on his lifetime earnings, making him one of just three known athlete billionaires.

Kieran Quaile
Update:
FILE PHOTO: May 21, 2022; Tulsa, OK, USA; Tiger Woods plays his shot from the ninth tee as rain falls during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at Southern Hills Country Club. Mandatory Credit: Michael Madrid-USA TODAY Sports/File Photo
Michael MadridUSA TODAY Sports

Tiger Woods has become a billionaire. According to Forbes, Woods now has an estimated net worth of at least $1 billion.

The 46-year-old’s net worth is at least $1 billion, based on his lifetime earnings, making him one of just three known athlete billionaires. The others are LeBron James and Michael Jordan, who hit a $1 billion after he retired with his investment in the NBA’s Charlotte Hornets.

LeBron first active NBA player to become a billionaire

James became the first active NBA player to cross the 10-digit net worth threshold last week. In an interview on his talk show earlier this week, he said he wants to buy an NBA team in Las Vegas at some point.

Four-time MVP James, who is the first active NBA player to become a billionaire, hopes to have a role in any Vegas outfit.

“I want to own a team,” he told The Shop. “I want to buy a team, for sure.

“I would much rather own a team before I talk. I want a team in Vegas.”

Woods’ earnings coming from sponsors

Woods has earned over $1.7 billion in salary, endorsements and other forms of income during his career, according to the report produced by Forbes. Despite being one of the all-time great golfers, less than 10 percent of the revenue comes from golf winnings. Most of it is from sponsors including Nike, Gatorade and Rolex.

Woods was previously No. 1 on Forbes’ highest-paid athletes list for a decade straight, starting in 2001. Last year, he earned $68 million off the course, making him the 14th-highest-paid athlete in the world by Forbes’ rankings.

“He hit the right time in the right sport, being an athlete with a diverse background who was approachable,” veteran sports business consultant and Columbia lecturer Joe Favorito says. “Brands love knowing they’re getting someone who is embraced not just by the traditional but also by the casual fans.”

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