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Facebook will review its rules after Donald Trump's controversial messages

Mark Zuckerberg said that Facebook is now reviewing their policies over use of force and voter suppression amid the criticism of President Trump’s recent comments.

Facebook will review its rules after Donald Trump's controversial messages
Erin Scott REUTERS

Last week Mark Zuckerberg suffered a lot of criticism after deciding not to remove President Donald Trump’s Facebook post amid the protests all over the United States over Floyd’s death and police brutality. Trump wrote on his social media account “when the looting starts, the shooting starts,” and he said he would use military force to control the chaos.

Trump sparks Facebook review

Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg said that his company would revise its policies against violent threats and voter suppression after facing intense criticism from people and his own employees of how he handled Trump’s post a few days ago.

Recently it was reported that one of Facebook’s employees, Tim Aveni, had decided to quit his job over Zuckerberg’s decision on how to manage Trump’s post. And some internal documents from the company showed thousands of employees opposed the CEO’s decision, ran the story in the Washington Post on Friday.

The idea is that Facebook will look to improve content policies while also building products to advance racial justice. “I know many of you think we should have labeled the President’s posts in some way last week,” Zuckerberg said in a post.

“We’re going to review potential options for handling violating or partially-violating content aside from the binary leave-it-up or take-it-down decisions. Our current policy is that if content is actually inciting violence, then the right mitigation is to take that content down, not let people continue seeing it behind a flag…

US President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden.

"...there is no exception to this policy for politicians or newsworthiness. I think this policy is principled and reasonable, but I also respect a lot of the people who think there may be better alternatives, so I want to make sure we hear all those ideas. I started meeting with the team yesterday and we’re continuing the discussion soon,” Zuckerberg’s statement continued.

In response to growing unrest among employees, the tech CEO held an emergency town hall meeting this week, according to the Washington Post, during which 5,500 workers voted on questions. Also employees were questioning if Zuckerberg had an “abusive relationship” with the president. Current employees went as far as staging a virtual walkout and online therapy company Talkspace cut ties with Facebook over the issue.