PRESEDENTIAL DEBATE

Last debate Trump vs Biden tonight: time, TV and how to watch live online

President Trump faces presidential nominee Joe Biden in the second and final live televised debate on Thursday night at 9 p.m. ET. The election will be held on 3 November.

Last debate Trump vs Biden tonight: time, TV and how to watch live online
JONATHAN ERNST REUTERS

The second and final presidential debate between Republican President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden will be held tonight, Thursday 22 October. It begins at 9 p.m. ET / 6 p.m. PT (3 a.m. CEST early Friday morning) and will last for 90 minutes with no breaks.

Follow the final debate between Donald Trump and Joe Biden live

This was supposed to be the third such meeting of the two men but after the originally planned second debate was cancelled, even more attention will be focused on this one.

Where can I watch the final presidential debate on TV or online?

All the major US networks and cable news channels are showing all the presidential debates: ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC, CNN, Fox News, MSNBC and C-Span.

C-Span and CBS News are also showing it live on YouTube.

If you don’t have cable TV one option is a paid-for live-TV streaming, with the following options carrying many or all of the major networks and cable news channels.

Sling TV
Hulu with Live TV
AT&T TV Now
FuboTV
YouTube TV

You’ll need a decent internet connection to use them.

Live coverage on AS English

We'll have live coverage of the debate, as well as commentary, fact-checking, and insight right here on AS English. As ever, you'll be able to get involved using the comments section within the feed.

Where is the Trump vs Biden debate happening?

The Nashville's Belmont University will be the venue for tonight's debate. The institution is a private Christian university, whose motto is “From here to anywhere”. How appropriate that sounds given the circumstances.

This is only the second time Tennessee has hosted a presidential debate, the first was in 2008, between Barack Obama and John McCain, also at Belmont University.

Who is moderating Trump vs Biden?

A stand-in for presidential debate moderator Kristen Welker participates in rehearsals for the second and final 2020 presidential campaign debate.

After Fox News anchor, Chris Wallace, chaired the fiery first debate, this one will be moderated by NBC's Kristen Welker, a White House correspondent for the Comcast-owned network. She's well-versed in moderating from her work on shows such as Weekend Today and Meet the Press. Whether she will be able to control Trump is the million dollar question, of course, although he's already started his defence by lazily calling her 'biased'.

Welker graduated from Harvard in ’98 with a history degree and has worked at ABC affiliate stations in Redding, California and Providence, Rhode Island. She was with the NBC affiliate in her hometown of Philadelphia before joining NBC News in 2010 where she became a White House correspondent a year later.

She was named 2020’s Outstanding Broadcast journalist at the Washington Women in Journalism Awards last month, and she won a National Emmy Award for her coverage of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash.

Format and topics for final Trump and Biden debate?

What is the format for the debate?

The format for the final debate is the same as the first clash between the pair. Each segment addressing one topic will last around 15 minutes, with each candidate getting two minutes to respond to the moderator’s question, before a deeper discussion on the subject.

Note that a likely crucial difference tonight compared to the first debate is that the microphones of the other candidate will be muted to ensure an uninterrupted two minute introduction for each topic.

What topics will Trump and Biden debate?

Biden and Trump will go head to head on the following topics:

- Fighting covid-19

- American families

- Race in America

- Climate change

- National security

- Leadership

As you may remember, in the first debate the candidates also answered questions directly on the coronavirus and race tensions, as well as touching on the other subjects. Although the economy - rated most important by voters - is not a subject in its own right, we expect it to be thoroughly debated as we go through the other elements.