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NFL

Former Green Bay Packers QB Brett Favre misses payment deadline

The former Super Bowl champion is involved in a large scale embezzlement scheme in Mississippi

Update:
Former Green Bay Packers QB Brett Favre misses payment deadline
Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports

In the wake of his apparent involvement in a welfare case it seems the former NFL star quarter back hasn't held up his end of the bargain.

Brett Favre misses the repayment deadline

According to a statement on Tuesday by the Mississippi state auditory, Brett Favre missed the deadline to pay $228,000 in interest on welfare money that he was paid for a public speaking contract which he did not honor. Auditor Shad White stated that the matter would now be placed in the hands of the state attorney general's office. The news comes just one month Favre was sent a letter demanding that payments be made. White added that the attorney general is responsible for the enforcement auditor demands which are not met.

"My understanding is the AG and the Department of Human Services have given authority to a private attorney to recoup the misspent money," White posted on twitter. "We have been in contact with that attorney and will provide him any information he needs."

Has Brett Favre committed a crime?

While Favre is not facing criminal charges, he is most definitely associated with the head of the organization that paid him who in turn is currently awaiting trial in one of Mississippi's largest embezzlement cases on record. It is understood that Favre has yet to respond to both an official request for comment by The Associated Press as well as the statements made by White on Twitter.

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Previously, Favre and White had a dispute on October 29th regarding White's accusation wherein he stated that Favre had failed to make speeches after being paid by welfare money. Indeed the allegations were made by White just a few days after Favre himself had repaid some $600,000 to the state. It was reported at the time that the amount was in fact the last portion of the $1.1 million that the auditor said Favre was paid by a nonprofit organization that was using funds which were intended to assist people in need in what is without doubt one of the states with the lowest income rates in the U.S. The $228,000 is - according to the auditor - what Favre still owes in interest.

Brett Favre stands firm against auditor Shad White

Speaking on the allegations Favre was adamant that he had done nothing wrong before pushing back. "Of course the money was returned because I would never knowingly take funds meant to help our neighbors in need, but for Shad White to continue to push out this lie that the money was for no-show events is something I cannot stay silent about," Favre wrote.

Favre, a three time NFL MVP and former Green Bay Packers quarterback is now a resident of Mississippi. In a written statement he explained that he appeared in commercials for which he was paid by a nonprofit organization. White insisted via a tweet that Favre's contract also stipulated that he make public speeches and a radio advertisement. White went on to add, "The CPA for Favre Enterprises confirmed this was your contract. ...You did not give the speeches. You have acknowledged this in statements to my agents."

How was the embezzlement scheme exposed?

It was early 2020 when the allegations of misspending of funds from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program was exposed. In the fallout, the former director of the Mississippi Department of Human Services and five other people were indicted. Among those individuals was Nancy New, who was the head of the Mississippi Community Education Center which in turn is the organization that compensated Favre. In May of that same year White stated that Favre had in fact repaid $500,000 of the $1.1 million in welfare money. In a Facebook post from the time, Favre said that his charity had provided millions of dollars to poor children in Mississippi and Wisconsin.

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