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How much does an electrician earn in US by hour: what is the average salary for this high demand job?

According to the White House, the Inflation Reduction Act, passed into law last year, allocates over $370 billion in solar, wind, and electric car technologies subsidies.

Update:
Unemployment expected to increase in 2023

U.S. clean energy firms are trying to overcome a labor shortage that threatens to derail President Joe Biden’s climate change agenda by providing higher wages and benefits, flying in trainers from overseas, and contemplating ideas like purchasing roofing and electric repair shops just to hire their workers.

According to the White House, the Inflation Reduction Act, passed into law last year, allocates over $370 billion in solar, wind, and electric car technologies subsidies. Consumers in the United States may begin taking advantage of these tax credits on January 1 to finance the installation of solar panels or an update to their existing heating systems. According to an estimate by BW Research for The Nature Conservancy, those expenditures will generate an average of 537,000 new employment each year over a decade.

How much do electricians make in the U.S.?

As of December 27, 2022, an Electrician in the United States may expect to make an hourly income anywhere from $22 to $30. Of course, the amount of money you make per hour depends on various variables, some of which are your level of education, your level of certification, the number of years you have spent in your field, and your expertise

A need for electricians and renewable energy

Despite the historically low unemployment rate in the United States (3.5% as of April 2019), many businesses are concerned that they won’t be able to find qualified workers to fill open positions, which might slow down efforts to phase out fossil fuels. Nevertheless, the labor market for renewable energy employment is strong despite layoff announcements and other signals of economic slowing.

Electric car and battery manufacturers, as well as solar panel and home efficiency installation, are all expected to feel the effects of the shortage more keenly, prompting some businesses to use innovative measures to locate personnel.

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